Collective Memory: A Contemporary Film Series

Thursday, November 21, 12 - 8:30 pm
Calderwood Hall

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Collective Memory: A Contemporary Film Series 11/21/2019 12:00 PM 11/21/2019 8:30 PM isgm-event-Collective Memory: A Contemporary Film Series America/New_York Experience the magic of the moving image through works ranging in style and topic by Gardner Museum Artists-in-Residence, Neighborhood Salon Luminaries, and local filmmakers. 25 Evans Way, Boston, MA 02115 aIwSTBiOnzHrlaECKmIR43731

Experience the magic of the moving image through a selection of works by Gardner Museum Artists-in-Residence, Neighborhood Salon Luminaries, and local filmmakers. Ranging in length from just a few minutes to almost an hour, these works explore a range of historical, political, social, and conceptual topics from both an artistic and documentary viewpoint.

Afternoon Schedule | 12–5 PM

Lunar Reflection Transmission Technique, 2007-present | 59 minutes
Taro Shinoda | 12–2 PM, introduced by Tiffany York, Assistant Director, Artist-in-Residence Program and Special Projects

As a resident in 2007, Taro Shinoda was inspired by the moonlight and the sense of calm that reigns in the Gardner Museum Courtyard to develop his Lunar Reflection Transmission Technique. Shinoda constructed a telescope out of cardboard and a video camera; with this instrument, he filmed the moon and landscapes in different parts of the world. Lunar Reflections is a lyrical compilation of the footage Shinoda captured.

The Tourist, 2001-2019 | 60 minutes
Lee Mingwei | 2–4 PM

Lee Mingwei’s participation-based artwork finds a new outlet in the film The Tourist. Individuals guide the artist through the places, spaces, and experiences that define their city, divulging secrets that only a true, and devoted, local could know. Mingwei explains that the tour guides are “…the creators of the artwork with me, and they are truly the owners of the artwork.”

Mistelpartition (Mistel Score), 2006 | 7 minutes
Su-Mei Tse | 4–5 PM

In Mistelpartition, the camera moves continually along a row of trees whose branches are filled with clusters of mistletoe. Musical notes in sync with the mistletoe clusters as they come into view. These single notes transform the landscape into sheet music for a concerto. The viewer is able to hear and “see” the music through Tse’s eyes by following the notes as the score progresses—as sound, nature, and art combine in beautiful harmony.

Shaping, 2019 | 7 minutes
Su-Mei Tse | 4–5 PM

Tse presents a video of an ongoing act of undulating clay being shaped by hand and then dissolving, accompanied by a soundtrack based on low frequencies. Creating an interplay between the aural and visual, the motion is not towards a final result, but to demonstrate soothing movements creating a mesmerizing endless choreography. The Gardner is thrilled to premiere this new work by the artist.

New Immigrant and Refugee Visions | 5–7 PM

A project introduction video kicks off this series, and it is followed by a talk with Braulio Tellez-Vilches, who immigrated from Cuba in 2017 and lives in East Boston.

Lift with Your Heart, 2019 | 8 minutes
Braulio Tellez-Vilches 

Choreographer Jean Appolon struggled for years to find a sense of belonging in his native Haiti and in the United States. He discovered his purpose in teaching dance to heal and engage community members of all ages and backgrounds in celebrating cultural diversity.

Borrowing Fire, 2019 | 13 minutes
Kebrewosen Densamo

“In Ethiopia, growing up, we used to go to the neighbor and say, ‘Can I borrow some fire?’ because we didn’t have matches.” Yonas tells this story to his congregation as an analogy for their relationship with God, borrowing God’s “fire” to warm and feed their own lives. It also symbolizes what Yonas sees as his purpose as an immigrant—to help people struggling with depression, homelessness and addiction. Contrary to stereotypes about immigrants and rural Americans, Yonas finds that his immigrant heritage, accent, and personality opens doors.

Pulse of a Dream, 2019 | 12 minutes
Mubarak Muwonge Nsamba

Why do different ethnic groups end up pigeon-holed in particular industries: Vietnamese flooring refinishers, Ugandan and Haitian health workers…? A Ugandan immigrant turns the camera on himself and his family as he struggles to understand why he, his wife and most of their fellow Ugandans, with degrees in other professions, are working as nursing assistants. He’s surprised to discover that the Ugandan version of the American dream involves taking care of America’s sick and elderly.

Third Thursdays | 7–8:30 PM

Plant the Seed, 2019 | 11 minutes
Taina Asili | introduced by Luana Morales, Neighborhood Salon Luminary, followed by a talk with Taina Asili and Leah Penniman

Plant the Seed is a music-video documentary about farmer and educator Leah Penniman and her journey to become the co-founder of Soul Fire Farm, as well as a national leader in the Food Justice Movement. Penniman is the author of Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land.

A talk with Taina Asili and Leah Penniman follows this final projection.

Other Days of this Festival

Landscape Lectures

Beatrix Farrand's American Landscapes

May 14, 2020, 7 - 9 pm

Join us for a screening of Beatrix Farrand’s American Landscapes, followed by historian John Beardsley, educator Anne Cleves Symmes, and filmmaker Stephen Ives in conversation with Charles Waldheim.

Tickets | Museum Admission

Tickets are required and include Museum admission.

Adults $15, seniors $12, students $10, free for members and children 17 and under.

  • Online, by clicking the TICKETS button above*
  • By calling the box office at 617 278 5156, Wednesday-Monday, 10 am-4 pm*
  • In person: Visit the Museum and purchase at the door, Wednesday-Monday, 11 am-4:30 pm

*Handling charges apply to these orders

In the Company of Artists has been generously supported by Tom and Lisa Blumenthal and William C. and Joyce K. Fletcher. The Artist-in-Residence program is directed by Pieranna Cavalchini, Tom and Lisa Blumenthal Curator of Contemporary Art, and is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Barbara Lee Program Fund. The Museum receives operating support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, which receives support from the State of Massachusetts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Media sponsor: WBUR